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Bio4Energy Featured in DI Future Energy Print E-mail
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Written by Anna Strom   
Friday, 20 January 2012 20:08
Today, January 20, Bio4Energy is featured alongside key players in DIFutureEnergy 012Bio4Energy was featured along with key Swedish energy players in a Dagens Industri Future Energy newspaper insert. Photo by Bio4Energy.
the Swedish energy sector in the Swedish daily Dagens Industri, in
its Future Energy insert, under the heading “Green Gold to Replace Fossil Oil”.

B4E teamed up with Umeå University, the B4E lead partner in northern Sweden, and with highly talented researchers of its Chemical Biological Centre, to spread the message about the way in which B4E intends to make a substantial contribution towards creating sustainable biorefinery based on forest-sourced materials or organic waste.

“We have drawn together top-qualified researcher and leading companies in green technology”, Stellan Marklund said in the Future Energy insert of the 90 scientists and some 20 companies that make up B4E. They are spread across northern and central Sweden at Umeå University, Luleå University of Technology, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and the research institutes Innventia and the Energy Technology Center at Piteå.

Further, today's advertorial in DI says that, as a Strategic Research Environment the scientists, consultants and their industrial partners have been tasked by the Swedish government to develop state-of-the-art methods and tools for producing renewable fuels and chemicals. These efforts will help reduce society’s dependence on fossil oil, supporting the environment and climate in the process.

Moreover, the Umeå University professor Marklund revealed, B4E expects to make a major contribution to educating tomorrow’s bioenergy and biorefinery researchers, starting in earnest this year by developing a B4E Graduate School by which doctoral students will receive top-of-the-line training based on the latest research results and technological development in the field.

“The graduate school will render the (curriculum) for PhD students in bioenergy and biorefinery more efficient. We can offer first-rate training in the area of energy and will be bringing in any (expertise) that we lack from the outside”, Marklund concluded.