biofuels

  • International Day of Forests 2017

    Video by courtesy of the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations.
  • Lack of Funding Puts End to Large-scale Pilot Trials of BioDME and Bio-based Methanol in Sweden - Audio

    LTU Green Fuels at Pitea SEBiofuel production at large-scale pilot operations at Piteå, Sweden will cease. Photo by courtesy of the Luleå University of Technology.

    LTU Green Fuels at Piteå—Sweden's only large-scale pilot operations for the production of liquid biofuel from forestry residue—are going to cease its activities due to lack of funding, according to a press release issued by its owner, the Luleå University of Technology.

    Despite the pilot plant's having delivered about 1000 tonnes of clean, bio-based dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol, and despite the product having been successfully trialled as fuel in commercial trucking operationsby the car manufacturer Volvo, the Swedish Energy Agency had decided not to extend funding beyond the 100 million Swedish kroner it had granted for the past three years, the press release said. It appears that the current 17 employees at LTU Green Fuels will soon have to look around for other work.

    "I think it's a shame that we have to discontinue the work at the plant but I am nevertheless hopeful that the technology [developed there] has a future. It has been thoroughly verified in our pilot plant", said This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., professor at the LTU and part of the research and development platform Bio4Energy Thermochemical Conversion Technologies.

    In successive interviews since the start of Bio4Energy in 2010, he has been pointing out that for industry to take the step to commercialisation, a long-term and stable political framework is needed that is supportive of a large-scale roll out of second-generation or more advanced biofuels and co-products.

  • Lignin, Pyrolysis Oil, to Become 'Bio-crude' for Use in Fossil Oil Refineries, Biofuels

    Lignin hyrdocracker SP ETC 25516Hyrdocracker reactor for pre-treated biomass. Illustration by courtesy of Magnus Marklund.New pilot facilities for the upgrading of lignin (which plant matter makes up roughly a third of the wood in trees) and of pyrolysis oil to a crude bio-based oil, or "bio-crude", is being installed at Bio4Energy member organisation SP Energy Technology Center(SP ETC) at Piteå, Sweden. The oil giant Preem has positioned itself as a forerunner in the search for renewable alternatives to fossil oil in its refined products, and are financing the new infrastructure at the SP ETC together with the Swedish Energy Agency and others.

    "The technology is based on a principle in use in [fossil] oil refineries for the cracking and hydrogenation of fossil residual streams. We will be making a form of bio-crude which is adapted for going straight into a refinery, as a type of blend-in product which can be added to upgrade crude oil", said This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., CEO at the SP ETC.

    The product of the pilot operations will be entirely bio-based, with the lignin content having been previously extracted from black liquor, which is a residual stream in pulping, and the pyrolysis oil made on the premises from forestry residue, such as tree tops and branches from northern Sweden forests. Marklund said that the new facilities, small enough to fit into a standard container, would be taken into operation in the last quarter of this year with a specific lignin and pyrolysis upgrading project in mind and which would end in the first quarter of 2017.

    "In this first one the end product will be blend-in biofuels. In a longer term perspective the pilot will be used more generally [for the upgrading of] liquefied biomass", according to Marklund who is a PI on the research and development platform Bio4Energy Thermochemical Conversion Technologies.
  • Lignofuels Conference, Helsinki, Finland

    Conference Topics Include:

     
     
      • Advanced Biofuels & Materials: European Market Overview
      • Key Developments in Nordic Countries with the Focus on Finland - the Power House of Advanced Biofuels Industry
      • Wood-Based Biorefineries Pave the Way to Successful Bioeconomy   
      • The Role of Advanced Biofuels in Decarbonising Transport
      • Scandinavian Examples - Demonstrating on Going Commitment to Bioenergy
      • Current Status of Swedish Biofuels Development and Government Policy
      • Latest Developments in Modern Biorefineries
      • Solving Enzymatic Problems
      • Advancing Pre-Treatment Processes
      • Supporting Innovation In Advanced Biofuels Industry
      • Conversion of Biomass to Pyrolysis Oil. An Update on The 5 Ton / Hour Empyro Pyrolysis Plant after 2 Years of Operation
      • Renewable Aviation Fuel- Production of Jet Fuels From Biomass Feedstocks
      • Scandinavian Study Outlining Sustainable Aviation Fuels
      • Advancing Efficiency and Optimising the Forest Biomass Supply Chain
      • Finance Session: Why Invest in Advanced Generation Fuels?
      • State of the Art Technologies
      • Future Insights & Latest R&D Work
  • New Project to Turn Quinoa Residue into Bio-based Products

    Truth-about-human-food_280117Quinoa farming on the Andean Altiplano. Photo by courtesy of Truth About Human Food.

    Scientists in Sweden and Bolivia have teamed up to investigate whether residues from the Latin American country’s production of quinoa—the health food that helped a good number of poor Andean farmers to a higher standard of living in the early-to-mid 2000s, but with overproduction and falling prices in its wake—can be turned into biorefinery products such as renewable ethanol, bio-based polymers or so-called biopesticides.

    The three-year project, led from Sweden by This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. of Bio4Energy, started last month as news arrived that the prestigious Swedish Research Council had decided to fund researcher exchanges and laboratory expenses under its 2016 call for Development Research. Umeå University in Sweden and Bolivian Universidad Mayor de San Andrés are project partners.

    In essence, the Swedish and Bolivian researchers will pool their expertise in biochemical conversion of recalcitrant lignocellulosic materials, on the one hand, and in microbial biodiversity and agricultural conditions of the high Altiplano of the Andes, the high planes of the mountain range that straddles Bolivia and Peru, on the other. The scientists will start where food production stops, that is once the edible quinoa seeds have been separated from the rest of the quinoa plant and what is left are the stalk and seed coats.

  • Seminar on Bio-based Feedstock: 'Make No Mistake, There is Still Momentum for Building the Bioeconomy'

    Is the efficient and sustainable biorefinery of the future challenged by the low price of oil and gas and the lack of a political framework that encourages bio-based production in the long term? Yes. Have actors in the sector shut up shop while waiting for conditions to be right for launching the bioeconomy? Not at all.

    Judging from developments in Sweden, a precursor country in terms of biorefinery development based on woody materials and organic waste, great strides are being made in industry and academia to pave the way for a transition from an economy heavily reliant fossil fuels and materials based on petrochemicals, towards a bioeconomy. A few such developments were highlighted yesterday at a seminar at Umeå, in northern Sweden, on Feedstock for Sustainable Biofuel Production, by the Swedish Knowledge Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels (f3 Centre), the research environment Bio4Energy and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

    Anders-Hultgren-SCA
    Bioen-100-yrs-FF
    Bioen-use-SE
    Constraints-drivers
    Future-FF
    Johanna-Mossberg-f3
    MagnusHertzberg_SweTreeTechnologies
    Phiip-Peck-LU
    SCA-prod-plans
    STT-Field-Trials
    01/10 
    start stop bwd fwd

  • Seminar: Feedstock for Sustainable Biofuel Production, Umeå, Sweden

    Feedstock for sustainable biofuel production

    - Perspectives on tailor-made feedstock, influence of choice of method on estimates of climate impact and the role of EU policy and regulation

    a co-arrangement by f3, SLU and Bio4Energy

    6 February 2017, 10:15 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Venue: P.O. Bäckströms sal/aulan, SLU, Umeå

    The aim of the seminar is to give different perspectives on the feedstock side of the value chain of biofuel production. We choose to focus on the potential of tailor-made feedstock, effects of the choice of method on evaluating sustainability issues, as well as give an update of the role of EU policies and regulation in the development of sustainable biofuel production. The target audience is industrial, public and academic actors with an interest in the use of forest biomass, biorefinery and biofuel production and use. In addition, this will be an excellent opportunity to network with researchers, industry representatives and actors from the public sector representing the value chain of renewable transportation fuels.

    The programme contains plenary presentations and study visits to the Biomass Technology Centre (BTC) and the demonstration plant for torrefaction in Holmsund, IDU.

      

    f3 – fossil free fuels: The aim of the networking organization f3 is to contribute, through scientifically based knowledge, to the development of environmentally, economically and socially sustainable renewable fuels, as part of a future sustainable society. http://www.f3centre.se/

    SLU – Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences: The vision of SLU is to be a world-class university in the fields of life and environmental sciences. https://www.slu.se/en/

    Bio4Energy: The research environment Bio4Energy aims to create highly efficient and environmentally-sound biorefinery processes—including methods and tools for making products such as biofuels, "green" chemicals and new bio-based materials—which draw on biomass sourced from forests or organic waste as a raw material. http://www.bio4energy.se/

  • Symposium on Biotechnology applied to Lignocelluloses, Madrid, Spain

    4th Symposium on Biotechnology applied to Lignocelluloses - LignoBiotech IV, in Madrid, Spain
  • Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals, Baltimore, MD, U.S.A.

    38th SBFC (Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals), April 25-28, 2016, Baltimore, MD. http://www.simbhq.org/sbfc/  
  • Systems' Perspectives on Bioresources

    Bio4Energy studentsltu AnnaStromExtent and credits: 7.5 ECTS             


    Course coordinator: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 


    Objectives

    On completion of the course, students will:

    • Be able to understand how to apply a systems' perspective on their own research;

    • Have gained insights into the current global energy and environmental challenges; 

    • Have gained insights into the rational of sustainability; 

    • Have awareness of tools and methods used for environmental, technical and economic systems analysis. 

    Dates and locations

    Autumn 2017:

    9-13 October, Luleå, Sweden: Lectures and workshops;

    Followed by independent work on a project assignment.


    Contents

    The course consists of:

    • Lectures (on sustainability issues, systems analysis approaches and tools) and workshops;

    • Lectures on essential subjects for large-scale biorefinery or bioenergy research and;

    • A project assignment, where the students identify suitable systems analysis tools or methods to be applied to their own research. The outcome will be a draft research proposal, a journal or conference manuscript or a chapter of a thesis.

    Application and prerequisites

    To apply for enrolment in Biorefinery Pilot Research, mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    For enquiries regarding the course content, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Late application? Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
  • This Is Bio4Energy

    Bio4Energy wants to thank its members, stakeholders and funders for its five first years of building a research environment that links up key academic and business organisations actively trying to promote biorefinery—the invention and production of advanced biofuels, bio-based chemicals and materials from woody biomass or organic waste.

    To do so, and to spread the word further afield, Bio4Energy would like to show you two short films that are an attempt to summarise who we are and what we do.

    In film one, the Bio4Energy programme manager takes viewers by the hand and describes the fundaments of the research environment. We also step into the working world of three Bio4Energy Research and Development Platforms: Feedstock, Pretreatment and Fractionation, as well as Catalysis and Separation. We visit the scientists’ greenhouse were hybrid aspen plants are grown to make better trees for bio-based production and Sweden's only pilot plant for the roasting of biomass—torrefaction—for the ease of handling and converting woody and starch-based biomass into fuels and chemicals.

    Bio4Energy - A Biorefinery Research Environment from Bio4Energy on Vimeo.


    In film two, we meet the coordinator of the Bio4Energy Graduate School who says students interested in biorefinery based on wood or organic waste will get a "unique" experience in the Bio4Energy Graduate School. We hear about the work on Bio4Energy's "process" platforms: The Bio4Energy Thermochemical and Biochemical Platform, respectively; and tour the thermal conversion whizzes' labs at Umeå University.

    Bio4Energy - Biorefinery Research & Education from Bio4Energy on Vimeo.

    Since June 2015, Bio4Energy has a new page in the Swedish-language section of the Umeå University website. From there, most of Bio4Energy's press releases in Swedish may be accessed. There are also an interview with the Bio4Energy programme manager for the years 2010-2016 and general information about Bio4Energy. An even more recent interviewcan be accessed on page 9 and 10 of the latest issue of Tänk magazine in which This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. predicts that societies will have become bio-based in the year of 2065.

    Bio4Energy has gone from being a constellation of 44 enthusiastic researchers in 2009, to becoming a full-blown research environment with about 240 members across three universities, four research institutes and with a network of industrial partners in Sweden and beyond.

    Thank you to our sponsors, members and stakeholders for believing in Bio4Energy!

  • Umeå Renewable Energy Meeting 2016, Umeå, Sweden