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RISE Research Institutes of Sweden

  • Bio4Energy Part of Nation-wide Effort to Develop Non-fossil Airplane Fuel

    Parked airplane AnnaStrom2021Bio4Energy scientists and members of its Industrial Network are part of Sweden's effort to develop non-fossil airplane fuel. Photo by Anna Strom©2021.This year has seen large-scale effort in Sweden to render possible the creation and development of non-fossil airplane fuel, so-called jet fuel, a press release from the state-run Swedish Energy Agency said. Bio4Energy is part of this effort, both through scientists and members of the Bio4Energy Industrial Network.

    Experts at developing membranes for various industrial processes, are using the microporous solid material zeolite (ZSM-5, to be precise) as a catalyst in the production of bio-based hydrocarbon olefins or petrol from methanol. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., professor at Bio4Energy partner Luleå University of Technology (LTU) and colleagues are developing a process for making heavy hydrocarbons via the catalyst, without intermediate steps, according to a project description. 

    Industrial and institute partners are Haldor Topsoe, RISE Innventia and RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.

    Meanwhile, the Municipality of Umeå and Biofuel Region, have teamed up to assess needs in terms of policy development and market support mechanisms for rolling out fossil-fuel free fuel use by airlines flying on northern Sweden.

    The project will result in a roadmap for a transition to a sustainable airline industry in the northern part of the country, a project description said. Industrial partners are Swedavia, the company that operates Sweden’s ten busiest airports, along with the membership company RISE Processum and RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.

  • Bio4Energy Part of New Multi-partner Project to Create Biorefinery for Organic Waste

    Bio4EnergyNaserTavajohiLab Bio4Energy2022Naser Tavajohi and his student researchers are part of a new project to create a biorefinery starting from biogas-making operations. Photo by courtesy of Naser Tavajohi (edited by A.S.). is part of a new multi-partner project to create a biorefinery for organic waste—with end products such as bio-based plastics, animal feed, “green” chemicals, biofuels and higher alcohols (Fusel oil)—in a two-step process.

    If successful, the result could become a trendsetter concept for how to create a virtually waste-free system of making the said commodities, but as bio-based alternatives to their current fossil resource-based counterparts.

    Researchers at the University of Borås in Sweden gave birth to the idea that the concept of biogas making could be expanded to deliver much more than just biogas car fuel, which is produced from the fermentation of food and agricultural waste in an oxygen-free environment.  

    In addition to this kind of bacterial break down of organic residues (anaerobic digestion), they want to add two more main processes to reuse all of the contents of the organic waste feedstock. These processes are referred to as 'membrane reactors' and 'biological augmentation', in scientific speak.

    The new concept will be tested at “large-scale” research facilities tied to the University of Borås, according to assistant professor This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., who heads up Bio4Energy’s contribution to the project from Umeå University.

    Although Tavajohi could not give an exact figure on the envisioned capacity, the scale would be near or at the level of industrial implementation. Consultants from RISE Research Institutes of Sweden were set to assist the academic researchers in some part of the project, he told Bio4Energy Communications in an online interview.

  • Drop-in Fuels from Black Liquor Part Streams--Bridgning the Gap between Short and Long-term Technology Tracks

    Wetterlund E et al. 2020. Drop-in Fuels from Black Liquor Part Streams—Bridgning the Gap between Short and Long-term Technology Tracks. Report hosted by the f3 Swedish Centre for Renewable Transportation Fuels
  • Long-running Quinoa Project Hits Milestone with Classification of New Bacterium

    Salar de Uyuni CourtesyCarlosMartínScientists of the Quinoa Project on Salar de Uyuni salt flat, on the Andean Altiplano. From left: Katherine Marín, Carlos Martín, Leif Jönsson, Cristhian Carrasco and Juan Carlos Peñaranda Orozco. Far right is Diego Chambi, main author of the scientific article that outlines the identification, classification and characterisation of a new bacterial strain. Photo by courtesy of Carlos Martín.A long-running research project designed to create the conditions for making renewable fuels, chemicals and pesticides from residues of the agricultural crop quinoa; grown in extreme environments; has hit a major milestone.

    Bio4Energy’s long-running ‘Quinoa Project’, started in 2017 by scientists in Sweden and Bolivia, not only has expanded to a multi-partner effort, but also has classified and provided a detailed map of characteristics of a previously unknown bacterium that can be at the base of high value-added biorefinery products.

    This bacterium lives on the Andean Altiplano, or high-altitude plateau, of the great mountain range straddling Bolivia and a number of other South American countries. To protect itself from the intense sunlight and high salt concentration of its environment, it produces a type of polymer (a base component of many living organisms), which the scientists believe can be at the base of a number of high value-added biorefinery applications. It is this "exopolysaccharide" polymer that can become use products down the line.

    "We believe that this type of polymer will be useful for producing products of high market value. We can think about applications such as fine chemicals, medical materials and food additives", said Carlos Martín Medina of Umeå University, Sweden; who shares the project leadership with Cristhian Carrasco of the Bolivian Universidad Mayor de San Andrés.

  • New Projects to Map Cost of Increasing Carbon 'Efficiency' of Advanced Biofuels

    Bio4EnergyArlanda SE AnnaStrom2020Some of the feedstock that goes into bio-based jet fuel products being developed goes to waste already in the production process. Bio4Energy researchers have set out to find out how much and what can be done about it. Photo by Bio4Energy. researchers are launching the second in a series of projects, to map the extent of the so-called carbon efficiency of advanced biofuels and calculate the cost of efficiency improvements. In this context, carbon efficiency is a measure of the extent to which the carbon in the bio-based starting material, or feedstock, ends up in the final energy product.

    Whereas the first project looks at a number of routes to produce biofuels for road transport, via specific value chains; the second is focussed on bio-based jet fuel technologies and resulting products.

    According to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., researcher at RISE Research Institutes of Sweden; who leads the project on bio-based jet fuels; there is great variation in the carbon efficiency depending on the process route and technology.

    Biomass gasification employing Fischer–Tropsch technology and alcohols-to-jet, respectively, were two relevant tracks considered in this project in terms of using wood-based feedstock for jet fuel production in the short term, he explained.

  • Nytt sätt att framställa biobaserade produkter

    Bio4Energy at Umeå University: Nytt sätt att framställa biobaserade produkter, Process Nordic
  • Opportunity for Pulp Mill Operators to Make Climate-efficient 'Drop-in' Biofuels while Increasing Pulp Production Capacity

    Collage Sodra Morrum2 220920From the operating sites of two of the project partners: the Södra Cell Mörrum pulp mill and a worker at the Smurfit Kappa paper mill (insert). Both operations are in Sweden. Photos by courtesy of Per Pixel and Caroline Lundmark, respectively.A new report designed to lay bare the potential for coupling pulp production with biofuel making from pulping residue, shows that there is a double benefit to be had in doing so for pulp mill operators.

    First, production capacity could be increased at existing mills. Second, climate-efficient transport biofuel could be produced at a cost per energy unit that is on a par or better, compared with similar biofuels made from residues from forestry operations.

    The new fuels would be so-called drop-in biofuels, which means that they are functional equivalents of their petroleum fuel counterparts and thus can be directly blended in with these latter at any ratio.

    The researchers' report identifies two main technologies that would put the production cost of the biofuel at 80 euros per megawatt-hour (MWh) or about 65-to-75 euro cents per litre. It is the result of a collaboration project between Bio4Energy systems analysis researchers at the Luleå University of Technology (LTU) in Sweden, companies in the sector and researchers from the RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.

  • Season's Greeting from Bio4Energy 2020 with Updates

    Bio4Energy SG AnnaStrom2020 500Season's Greetings from Bio4Energy. Photo by Anna Strom© 2020It is the end of the season. And boy what a season. There was the coronavirus disease, Covid-19; that turned plans on their head and saw us turn the regular Bio4Energy events into online meetings. 

    There was intense work to prepare the research environment Bio4Energy for a much-hoped-for third programme period, from 2022. Programme manager This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., professor at Umeå University, is leading the work to develop a new programme plan and context analysis with input from the Bio4Energy platform leaders and research group leaders.

    Last but not least, there was great progress made across the seven research and development (R&D) platforms to deliver excellent research and develop collaborations. Please review the news of this page or find our Newsletters in the Twitter feed.

    With this said, Bio4Energy wants to wish all its followers from near and far,

    Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

    We would be delighted for your continued support and exchange of experiences in 2021. Thank you very much for 2020 Bio4Energy researchers and students, Board and Steering Group, as well as members of the Industrial Network.

  • The 2021 Bio4Energy Annual Report Is Out

                                   Grass after a summer rain. Photo by Anna Strom©2022.This is the release of the Bio4Energy Annual Report for 2021.

    It gives an overview of the research and development conducted on the seven Bio4Energy Research and Development Platforms.

    It hints at the work of the Bio4Energy PhD students, by listing the topics for and names of those who successfully defended their thesis, at the end of their PhD project.

    It shows which research teams won a special acknowledgement, in the section for Awards and Commissions of Trust.

    There is a section for Media and Outreach.

    Last but not least, the Bio4Energy Advisory Board is profiled. It is made up of key people for the bio-based sector in Sweden. It serves to guide the Bio4Energy board and programme managers, in their efforts to make the research environment useful not only to itself, but also to the sector.